BILLBOARD

The Exit
New Beat
Despite wearing its Clash influences on the cover of "New Beat," New York's the Exit has a refreshing take on modern punk rock. Unlike the swarms of new punk bands plagiarizing the Green Days and Offsprings of the 1990s, the Exit relies on the kind of solid songwriting and diversity that was integral to helping bands like the Clash grow beyond a punk labeling.
"Worthless" opens the album with a poppy guitar-oriented sound that instantly validates the band's mainstream accessibility. But it seems to be the quieter moments like "Sit and Wait" that are infinitely harder to pull off and the Exit does so admirably. The outfit elicits memories of bands like the Police as the song slowly builds to a crescendo and seamlessly transitions into "Scream and Shout," a blistering pop burst.
Guitarist Ben Brewer and bassist Jeff DaRosa's pleasing vocals are a welcome presence. Unlike their contemporaries, there's zero nasal whine present in their singing. Indeed, the Exit is a nice surprise, evoking memories of great bands of the past but offering enough contemporary twists to hook in younger listeners.
David Thomas


 
LOLLIPOP

The Exit
New Beat
Bad ass pop songs played with a NY deli helping of elbow grease. Don't think it's all hooks and "commercial radio friendly" just cuz' of the outstanding singing (shared between all three members of the band, no less!): The Exit lay it on top of substantial crunch and boom. Imagine The Police's songs played by The Clash through a post-NYHC band, and you've got New Beat. And can I just say how awesome the melodies are again? A tour with these guys and The Break (but not The Ghost or The Holy Ghost or The... ah fuck it) would go down a storm.
Tim Den


 
AMPLIFIER

The Exit
New Beat
Meet the New Beat, same as the old beat. And that's a good thing. The Exit deliver a no-frills power pop album steeped in the ragged glory of a live performance. The triumvirate of guitarist Ben Brewer, bassist Jeff DaRosa and drummer Gunnar purvey melodic thrash via a myriad of tight poly-rhythms and a flair for the dramatic. The boys shed crocodile tears in "Worthless,"Lonely Man's Wallet," and "Sit and Wait," nick a few licks from The Police in "Trapped," and wax political in "Defacto" and "Question the Chorus." Smart pop? You bet.
Tom Semioli


 
ALL MUSIC

The Exit
New Beat
The Exit make a truly impressive splash on their first major release. Where so much emo and indie rock falls back on a rigid formula of depressing seriousness, the Exit offer a Police-style approach that adds a relaxed atmosphere to the songs. It isn't like they're pumping out "Roxanne" part two, but they do structure their melodies and guitar work quite similarly to Sting and company. Songs like "Find Me" are energetic pop songs that transcend their genre to simply stand out as memorable tracks, which is something that few bands floating around the underground have the power to do. It isn't life-changing, but it is a pleasant sonic soup that points to better and brighter things for this trio.

Bradley Torreano


 
UNDER THE VOLCANO

The Exit
New Beat
Some Records

Holy fuck! The Exit is my favorite new band. Hands down the best record I have heard in years. Aggressive, Pop/ Rock with early British, Garage Rock influence. Picture Big Drill Car's Frank Daly singing with The Police. Pristine production, mature songwriting, and virtuoso musicianship that rocks like fuck without being pretentious. "Scream & Shout" may in fact be, one of the greatest songs ever written. - Weiss


 
ABHOR.ORG

The Exit
New Beat
Some Records

These days in music, no one wants to be labeled as "punk" anymore. Who can blame them really? The phrase has come to be synonymous with being sloppy and having some sort of ties to Blink 182. Everything with melody is now tagged as "emo," which if you read major publications or even some zines can be used incorrectly for bands like the Starting Line or Good Charlotte. Everyone these days wants to be classified as rock because it's just all that easier. The Exit is easily just a simple rock and roll band. Mid-tempo songs in the vein of Third Eye Blind with maybe a 1980's twist. Straightforward choruses, matched with pretty classically styled song structure and fairly vague lyrics are what you'll find. With all that said, I enjoy this and I think most who will listen to it will feel the same. Arena rock drums, tambourine use, all the favorites are here. Indie geeks might label this as "post-hardcore", but let's face it folks, this is just a good rock record plain and simple.


 
LOST AT SEA

The Exit
New Beat
Some Records

NYC- based trio The Exit plays a combination of poppy rock from garageland and more relaxed numbers with clean delayed guitar over melodic bass. Many times, the songs are structured with transitions from one sound to the other. The themes of the songs are attached to youth in the big city environment. The Exit presents an appeal much like pre-London Calling Clash, with more modern mainstream-radio and personal appeal.
"Worthless" and "Lonely Manˆs Wallet" open the album as strong rock songs, creating a base from which they will diverge. Parts of "Trapped" sound like The Police, and "Sit and Wait" captures the atmosphere of light breaking through a forest canopy. "DeFacto" and "Question The Chorus" touch on social issues, but the lyrics throughout are more of an emotional account of one's place in the world.
While a good album with memorable pop choruses, The Exit seems to wear out its potential. To avoid sounding the same on every other song, the band may consider exploring some new dimensions. A large part of the redundancy may be due to the fact that there are only three band members, though they never seem to be lacking in instrumentation. They certainly have identified themselves with a sound, but have made it clear that they are thinking of the future in saying, "Our goal for this band is to keep growing and changing and getting better." Who can argue with that? The Exit is off to a good start, and most of the songs are good enough to make up for the radio choruses.

Reviewed by Lance Birch


 
CULTURE BUNKER

THE EXIT
New Beat
Some Records

I was very stoked to get this record in the mail. It doesn't get released until next month so that's always nice to be included before the media blitz starts on any band. The Exit are a band I heard earlier this year from Marko in Sugarcult. The whole Sugarcult band are big fans of The Exit. The photocopy artwork on the sleeve is a good simple graphic. Understated. Good so far. The first thing you will notice is that the guitars are not all cranked to 11 with distortion pedals blowing holes through your eardrums. These guitars use delay and chorus for a sound that hovers between The Police and Jimmy Eat World, although some moments recall Crumb. Like the album title sez, this is a new beat. This is not punk rock and they are trying to tell you this, at the outset. The Exit are one of the new crop of bands that have moved on from the 1980 punk rock world and are zeroing in on the first wave of postpunk English bands. This record makes one hopeful that new bands are emerging with the correct influences. You can bet The Exit don't listen to New Found Glory, for instance. I would bet that the cd's in regular rotation around their house are The Chameleons, Echo & The Bunnymen, and Elvis Costello. This is musically articulate music for more demanding listeners, which means if you're tired of the same old "new school" bullshit and you're ready to move on, this is a good buy. Demo the songs "Still Waiting" and "Find Me" to get a feel for their sound. "Still Waiting" sounds like a radio hit, so be prepared.

---Scott A.


 
GEEK AMERICA

THE EXIT
New Beat
Grade: B+

So i opened this package to see a Clash style layout and as the first song kicked in i prepared to roll my eyes for yet another well produced yet forgettable band. Despite the lackluster first impression, i continued to listen though, and i'm glad i did so. At times elements of the Police come into play, at other times it's more poppy and modern sounding. The Exit do a good job of keeping your interest while mixing up their sound. This certainly isn't the greatest thing to come out this year, but they're good for a drive down the freeway, windows down. Before long, 16 year old girls across the country will be singing along with The Exit, and who could ask for much more as a relatively new pop band?(BGW)


 
FRESH ANGLES

THE EXIT
New Beat
Some

Every part of The Exit's new album, New Beat, fits together perfectly. All the sounds mesh completely; the guitars acquiescing with the vocals. New Beat combines pure rock rhythms with sheer energy, producing a sound that's like nothing describable. The album is fluid, inducing involuntary dancing. By the second listen you're already singing along, tuning out the rest of the world.

The intros pull you into and trap you in the songs. The album's variation comes from The Exit's members, Ben Brewer and Gunnar, being submerged early in the New York City punk scene.

New Beat has a subtle aggressiveness but also a definite pop sensibility. The album has that garage band feel, rustic and raw, adding to their appeal. Some albums hold that one great song that's destined to make them one hit wonders, but New Beat has 11.

Lyrically pleasing and with music that you can hum along to, The Exit has the entire package. Within the album's casing, they've managed to capture what music should be. The album starts with "Worthless," a fast paced song that's later followed by "Sit and Wait," track three on New Beat. The song starts with a relaxed feel but then the guitar comes in and drives the song into the chorus.

The entire album feels like an adrenaline rush, quickly flowing into catchy choruses with the right amount of speed, as your blood rushes, the vocals powerfully leaving the speakers. The lyrics are sung whole-heartedly, your heart racing. You hunger for the next song, as your whole body pulsates with the music. The album reaches its peak at track six with "Find Me" and the adrenaline begins to wear away around "Defacto," the ninth song, energy becoming slick grooves. By track 11, "Watertown," the calm rushes over you, and by the end The Exit has delivered a sound that's comparable to the music of Sublime but with vocals that sound new and original, smooth with an edge. The Exit has that special something, their sound is definitely worth hearing.


 
PASTE PUNK

THE EXIT - New Beat (Some)
Review by Jordan A. Baker
Let's face it, when doing reviews, comparable band names are often thrown about without regard. How many times have I listened to a metalcore band and had the POISON THE WELL radar come flying up just because it's permenantly lodged in my head? A lot. With that said, and I don't use this comparison lightly, THE EXIT invoke the absolute best of my musical soul and score tremendous points by reminding me of what made a band like THE CLASH so darn special. The irony in this release's title is without a doubt arguable - the "New Beat" has far much more in common with "London Calling" than say, THE STROKES, who are just perhaps the most innovative thing ever! Like totally! So anyway, this is one heck of an enjoyabe full-length, carving through 11 tunes of superstrength melodies, a dour reggae influence, and a fluid vibe that couldn't come pre-manufactured and canned if tried. Yes my friends, THE EXIT have struck musical genius, and not only that, they carry the weighty world on their shoulders with their personal, socially conscious lyrics. "Sit and Wait" explore the tales of a life separated from the ethos of freedom and adventure, slaved away to work and survival, and "Questions The Chorus" evinces the obligatory 'urban jungle' reference to tall buildings and concerns unmet. If there's a standout song - and surely, all are near equally impressive, it's the seventh track, "Still Waiting" that drips of summer anthemlike qualities, with its vocal hook of 10,000 fishermen strong. Alrighty, enough gushing - the "New Beat" is a brain-infiltrating album, and one that deserves your utmost attention.


 
30 MUSIC

THE EXIT - New Beat (Some)
It is hard to pin point the style of rock and roll that The Exit play. My best way to describe them would be if the Police formed after the new millenium.

Combining the Police's signature soaked reverb guitar tones with straight up pop, the Exit have crafted one of my favorite albums so far this year.

The album breaks in with a straight forward pop gem "Worthless" and ends with the emotionally driven "Watertown." From beginning to end the album does not stop rocking with catchy hooklines and well thought out vocal melodies. This trio uses their talents through all eleven tracks and leave you begging to hear what they do next.

There are really no stand out tracks here. All songs are great and blend well together. This is an insanely good record and should be owned by all. Pick this record up or you will be missing out.
-30-


 
WAKE ZINE

THE EXIT - New Beat (Some)
By KidAmy
East coast musicians The Exit are not your average punk band. While they combine aggressive punk licks with hooks, this band is an amalgam of British punk and poppy melodies. The opening song, "Worthless," is by far the catchiest song on the record, complete with a Ramones-esque guitar riff and the catchy chorus, "If you're so worthless/then why do I keep coming back again?" Other standout songs include "Scream and Shout," in which vocalists Ben Brewer and Jeff DaRosa exchange a singing dialogue. The Exit also address political issues in "Defacto" and "Question the Chorus," which reflect Brewer's studies in political science. Not all songs are rocking, though; for those who want to hear a softer side of The Exit, be sure to give "When I'm Free" and ¦Watertown² a listen.

This trio, made up of vocalist/guitarist Ben Brewer, vocalist/bassist Jeff DaRosa, and drummer Gunnar, have a clear goal when it comes to music: "We just want to keep growing and changing and getting better. We started the band so that we could play whatever kind of music we feel like playing, and that feels great. So we're going to keep on doing that. Once that stops, it'll be over."• So far, this plan seems to be working, because New Beat is full of rocking anthems, as well as more experimental poppy-punk.• Their music is similar to that of emo-rockers Jimmy Eat World, only with a twist of British punk. Loaded with catchy harmonies and beats, this record is sure to please those looking for the next big punk band.


 
HEARSAY

THE EXIT - New Beat
Review by Kurt Hernon
Now here's something that'll propel you back in time, I tell ya: three cats from the East Coast called The Exit who sound like they've spent an awful lot of their youth listening to both the Police and Agent Orange and remember when punk was about range not simply rage. Their fine little debut record is as much a big-time revelation as it is a sort of nostalgic surprise. Punk rock - in its more varied and less generic heyday - used to spawn little gems like this back when it was a world (not just a word) where diversity was less the exception than the goal. Bands like the Clash, the Jam, the Police, Television, U2 and the Talking Heads (we could go on for quite awhile like this) were all called "punk," and as hard as it may be to believe these days, the punk rock of back then always mined a wide range of influences, processed them and then shot back with a modern, energized amalgam of rock's scattershot tributaries (the Jam with Motown, the Police with reggae, the Talking Heads with polyrhythmic world beats and The Clash with, well, all of the above).

The Exit surprise on this sharp debut by dabbling in a similar vein as these punk predecessors, welding together sounds that range from near-emocore ("Lonely Man's Wallet") to the aforementioned Police-turned-Agent Orange pop ("Sit and Wait") to Replacements by way of early Goo Goo Dolls via Face to Face ("Scream and Shout") right on up to an exceptional, non-bombastic U2 melodrama ("Watertown"). It makes for some heady listening and a bit of fun that, on occasion, wades into political waters but never lets that screw up a kick-ass groove, a smokin' hot guitar lick or a memorable melody - and this album's got a few of each.


 
PUNK UPDATES

THE EXIT - New Beat
Review By: Will Skrivseth
Being a person who is receiving over 10 new albums a week, I find myself in the constant let down with bands. So when Some Records sent me The Exit " New Beat", I had a little hesitation towards listening to it. Well my friends, not only is New Beat a well developed album but contains all elements of well recorded album. It is a noise avalanche much like the bands The Stryder, Piebald, Rival Schools, and The Jazz June. This is an epic that will take you from the calm, into the storm and back again. I found myself entrenched into the sound and donated the rest of the day to listening to it. With smart positive vocals, and a rough edge as well. Now many times people only feel comfortable buying music they are aware of or own previous albums of. The Exit can change that for you. Being a bitter fan, and picky with music I was amazed that this album was so good. I tell you people check this one out.


 
AVERSION

THE EXIT - New Beat
Punk rock can be one of those hitchhiking serial killers. Young bands, ready to open things up in overdrive and burn through a new tank of gas to find a bit of excitement. What's a faster way than picking up a bit of company? After all, the hitcher's got a big duffel bag crammed to overflowing with sonic blueprints and eager audiences waiting for their next punk fix. Sounds a lot better than riding alone doesn't it? It's only after, on a particularly lonely stretch of roadway, the hitchhiker reveals his true intentions and wraps his hands around the throat of another poor, unsuspecting band. It doesn't take too long before he's choked the very last creative breath out of it and left it on the side of the road.

It's a little different for The Exit. It's smarter, stronger and, most importantly, in control. It knew exactly what it was getting into when it pulled over for Mr. Punk's waving thumb. It knew death was knocking « only this time The Exit was the one with blood on its hands, the one to emerge as a survivor.

Punks have been chasing their own tails for a couple generations now and, outside of the top 5 percent of the class, have more often just reinforced scene expectations and mainstream stereotypes than really got things rocking. The Exit's one of that top 5 percentile, however. It's a band that, although its punk roots poke through all over New Beat, isn't confined to a condemned squat full of mohawked Crass wannabes.

No, instead of the by-the-numbers punk, The Exit finds a sound that plays up both its pop hooks as well as the sort of dynamic bass/minimal guitar interplay that hints at a strong love for bands such as The Police, U2 and late-years Clash. Bassist Jeff Darosa covers the low end with the sort of super-cool ease that makes his deft handling of rhythm and melody seem like it's so natural it's done without a thought, and singer/guitarist Ben Brewer's got flash chops and, better yet, the brains to know how effective a bit of space in guitar figures can be. The trio rocks with a mix of the bubbling bass lines/minimal guitars and post-punk pop ("Trapped"), washes of guitar thrown over a persistent rhythm section ("Lonely Man's Wallet") or smolders with ballad potential that's "wasted" on a low-key punk tune ("Watertown"). In doing so, The Exit avoids the death-stench of punk clichª to get an album that's certainly part of the genre. New Beat's drenched in the secondhand smoke of not only punk rock but some truly great rock acts, to boot, a combination that makes this album the sort of record any maturing (read: nonteen-aged) punk with any taste whatsoever will eat up.